Fifty:

Errol Flynn, Tasmanian-born actor and ladies' man remembered for swashbuckler roles (June 20, 1909 -- October 14, 1959)
Glenn Gould, idiosyncratic Toronto-born pianist and subject of 32 short films (September 25, 1932 -- October 4, 1982)
Steve McQueen, Indiana-born movie star who often played tough intense loners (March 24, 1930 -- November 7, 1980)
Rod Serling, screenwriter and World War II veteran who created "The Twilight Zone" (December 25, 1924 -- June 28, 1975)
Herve Villechaize, French actor best known for playing Tattoo on Fantasy Island (April 23, 1943 -- September 4, 1993)

Fifty-one:

Napoleon Bonaparte, military genius, Emperor of France, establisher of Napoleonic Code (August 15, 1769 -- May 5, 1821)
Rene Goscinny, Paris-born author and humorist, co-creator of "Asterix" (August 14, 1926 -- November 5, 1977)
Stanley Milgram, psychologist who studied the "small world" effect and obedience to authority (August 15, 1933 -- December 20, 1984)
Moliere, 17th-century French theatre writer and master of comic satire (January 15, 1622 -- February 17, 1673)
Marcel Proust, French novelist best remembered for "A la recherche du temps perdu" (July 10, 1871 -- November 18, 1922)
Carl Wilson, lead guitarist and vocalist for the Beach Boys (December 21, 1946 -- February 6, 1998)

Fifty-two:

Doug Henning, Winnipeg-born magician, McMaster alumnus, Natural Law Party candidate (May 3, 1947 -- February 7, 2000)
Abbie Hoffman, founder of the Yippies, author of "Steal This Book" (November 30, 1936 -- April 12, 1989)
Harry Houdini, Hungarian-born and Wisconsin-raised escape artist and magician (March 24, 1874 -- October 31, 1926)
Grace Kelly, Oscar-winning actress and "Hitchcock blonde", princess by marriage (November 12, 1929 -- September 14, 1982)
Roy Orbison, Texan rock-and-roll pioneer remembered for his dark glasses and impressive vocal range (April 23, 1936 -- December 6, 1988)
Christopher Reeve, Superman portrayer, paralysis victim, stem-cell research advocate (September 25, 1952 -- October 10, 2004)
William Shakespeare, Bard of Avon, strong contender for title of "best writer in English" (April 23(?), 1564 -- April 23, 1616)
Frank Zappa, Baltimore-born composer and satirist, popular music's answer to Dadaism (December 21, 1940 -- December 4, 1993)

Fifty-three:

John Denver, New Mexico-born folk/country singer and amateur pilot (December 31, 1943 -- October 12, 1997)
Rene Descartes, French rationalist philosopher and inventor of coordinate geometry (March 31, 1596 -- February 11, 1650)
Philip K. Dick, science fiction author who experienced strange visions (December 16, 1928 -- March 2, 1982)
Dian Fossey, primate biologist from California later portrayed by Sigourney Weaver (January 16, 1932 -- December 26, 1985)
Jerry Garcia, San Francisco singer and guitarist who fronted the Grateful Dead (August 1, 1942 -- August 9, 1995)
Jim Henson, Mississippi-born and Maryland-raised puppeteer, creator of the Muppets (September 24, 1936 -- May 16, 1990)
Vivien Leigh, English actress who played Scarlett O'Hara, spouse of Laurence Olivier (November 5, 1913 -- July 7, 1967)
John von Neumann, Hungarian-American mathematician and smartypants, founder of game theory (December 28, 1903 -- February 8, 1957)
Emmy Noether, German mathematician, a leading 20th century algebraist, adopted Pennsylvanian (March 23, 1882 -- April 14, 1935)
Jackie Robinson, Georgia-born, Pasadena-raised athlete who broke baseball's colour barrier (January 31, 1919 -- October 24, 1972)
George Herman "Babe" Ruth, baseball immortal and one of the first sports superstars (February 6, 1895 -- August 16, 1948)
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, author of "Frankenstein", spouse of a Romantic poet (August 30, 1797 -- February 1, 1851)
Gene Siskel, collaborator of Roger Ebert, famous film critic with a famous thumb (January 26, 1946 -- February 20, 1999)

Fifty-four:

Nell Carter, Alabama-born actress best remembered for "Gimme A Break" (September 13, 1948 -- January 23, 2003)
Michael Landon, TV actor, star of "Little House on the Prairie" and "Highway to Heaven" (October 31, 1936 -- July 1, 1991)
Michael O'Donoghue, writer for National Lampoon and Saturday Night Live (January 5, 1940 -- November 8, 1994)
Robert Palmer, Yorkshire-born singer best remembered for "Simply Irresistible" (January 19, 1949 -- September 26, 2003)
John Ritter, SoCal-born actor and comedian best remembered for "Three's Company" (September 17, 1948 -- September 11, 2003)
Peter Sellers, British comedian, Inspector Clouseau portrayer, Goon Show member (September 8, 1925 -- July 24, 1980)
Luther Vandross, much-admired New York-born R&B singer who won eight Grammys (April 20, 1951 -- July 1, 2005)

Fifty-five:

Emily Dickinson, solitary Massachusetts poet who posthumously became a giant of American literature (December 10, 1830 -- May 15, 1886)
Bill Haley, Pennsylvania-raised rock pioneer who sang "Rock Around the Clock" (July 6, 1925 -- February 9, 1981)
Johnny Ramone, guitarist and longtime member of The Ramones, conservative rock star (October 8, 1948 -- September 15, 2004)
Will Rogers, affable Oklahoma-born humorist, entertainer, wit, and adopted Californian (November 4, 1879 -- August 15, 1935)

Fifty-six:

Betty Grable, St. Louis-born actress and singer, "pin-up girl" of World War II (December 18, 1916 -- July 3, 1973)
Adolf Hitler, German Fuehrer, genocidal murderous tyrant, anti-smoking campaigner (April 20, 1889 -- April 30, 1945)
Rick James, Buffalo-born funk musician who spent part of his early career in Toronto (February 1, 1948 -- August 6, 2004)
Abraham Lincoln, much-admired US president, signer of Emancipation Proclamation (February 12, 1809 -- April 15, 1865)
Charles Rocket, Maine-born Weekend Update anchor on Saturday Night Live (August 24, 1949 -- October 7, 2005)
Warren Zevon, Chicago-born acerbic and sardonic American singer/songwriter (January 24, 1947 -- September 7, 2003)

Fifty-seven:

Humphrey Bogart, stoic New York-born film legend, spouse of Lauren Bacall (December 25, 1899 -- January 14, 1957)
Chuck Cadman, BCIT grad, rock guitarist, independent MP for Surrey North (February 21, 1948 -- July 9, 2005)
Peter Cook, Cambridge-educated satirist and comedian who worked with Dudley Moore (November 17, 1937 -- January 9, 1995)
Gregory Hines, New York-born tap dancer, actor, and Tony award winner (February 14, 1946 -- August 9, 2003)
Curtis Mayfield, Chicago-born soul and funk musician, paralysis victim (June 3, 1942 -- December 26, 1999)
Jacques Plante, Shawinigan native who was the first NHL goalie to wear a mask (January 17, 1929 -- February 27, 1986)

Fifty-eight:

Don Cherry, jazz trumpeter who had nothing to do with hockey, dad of Neneh and Eagle Eye (November 18, 1936 -- October 19, 1995)
Andrea Dworkin, provocative and controversial American radical feminist author (September 26, 1946 -- April 9, 2005)
George Harrison, Beatle, film producer, introducer of the sitar into Western pop music (February 25, 1943 -- November 29, 2001)
James Joyce, Dublin-born author of "Ulysses" and "Finnegans Wake" (February 2, 1882 -- January 13, 1941)
Andy Warhol, Pittsburgh-born painter and filmmaker, big name in "Pop Art" (August 6, 1928 -- February 22, 1987)
Barry White, Galveston-born, Los Angeles-raised deep-voiced soul and disco singer (September 12, 1944 -- July 4, 2003)

Fifty-nine:

Clark Gable, Ohio-born Academy Award-winning actor, Rhett Butler portrayer (February 1, 1901 -- November 16, 1960)
Virginia Woolf, British author and feminist, member of the "Bloomsbury Group" (January 25, 1882 -- March 28, 1941)

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