Forty:

Lee Atwater, political strategist who apologized late in life for negative campaigning (February 26, 1951 -- March 29, 1991)
Lenny Bruce, controversial and influential American observational standup comedian (October 13, 1925 -- August 3, 1966)
Falco, Viennese classical-turned-pop musician who performed "Rock Me Amadeus" (February 19, 1957 -- February 6, 1998)
John Lennon, songwriter, Beatle, political activist, adopted New Yorker (October 9, 1940 -- December 8, 1980)
Jack London, San Francisco-born author remembered for "The Call Of The Wild" (January 12, 1876 -- November 22, 1916)
Glenn Miller, Iowa-born jazz musician and bandleader, Air Force pilot who disappeared (March 1, 1904 -- December 15, 1944)
Edgar Allan Poe, macabre American poet associated with Gothicism, Baltimore resident (January 19, 1809 -- October 7, 1849)
Jean Seberg, Iowa-born politically active actress who worked mostly in France (November 13, 1938 -- September 8, 1979)
Danitra Vance, Saturday Night Live cast member who experienced frustrations with being typecast (July 13, 1954 -- August 21, 1994)
Wesley Willis, eccentric Chicagoan musician with a rambling, high-energy style (May 31, 1963 -- August 21, 2003)

Forty-one:

Jane Austen, immortal English novelist and judge of character whom Hollywood owes a huge debt (December 16, 1775 -- July 18, 1817)
Abebe Bikila, Ethiopian long-distance runner, two-time Olympic marathon champion (August 7, 1932 -- October 25, 1973)
Mata Hari, Dutch exotic dancer convicted and executed for espionage (August 7, 1876 -- October 15, 1917)
Margaux Hemingway, Idaho-raised actress and model, granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway (February 19, 1955 -- July 2, 1996)
Alan Turing, British mathematician and cryptographer, pioneer of computing science (June 23, 1912 -- June 7, 1954)
Paula Yates, Welsh-born TV presenter who was involved with Bob Geldof and Michael Hutchence (April 24, 1959 -- September 17, 2000)

Forty-two:

John Cazale, Boston-born actor who costarred with Pacino and was engaged to Streep (August 12, 1935 -- March 12, 1978)
"Miss Elizabeth" Hulette, Kentucky-born mid-1980s wrestling personality (November 19, 1960 -- May 1, 2003)
Robert Francis Kennedy, attorney general, senator, presidential hopeful (November 20, 1925 -- June 6, 1968)
Ernie Kovacs, innovative TV comedian who wrote for MAD and influenced Letterman (January 23, 1919 -- January 13, 1962)
Elvis Presley, King of Rock and Roll, pop culture icon (January 8, 1935 -- August 16, 1977)
Gilda Radner, Detroit-born SNL alumna, energetic and lovable physical comedian (June 28, 1946 -- May 20, 1989)
Peter Tosh, outspoken and political reggae pioneer, Bob Marley collaborator (October 9, 1944 -- September 11, 1987)

Forty-three:

Louis Braille, French saddle-maker's son who invented a writing system for the blind (January 4, 1809 -- January 6, 1852)
John Candy, Toronto-born comedian, SCTV alumnus, prolific "everyman" actor (October 31, 1950 -- March 4, 1994)
John Holmes, Ohio-born adult film actor later portrayed by Val Kilmer (August 8, 1944 -- March 13, 1988)
E. C. Segar, Cartoonist from Illinois best known for creating Popeye (December 8, 1894 -- October 13, 1938)
Natalie Wood, San Francisco-born actress, costar of James Dean and Warren Beatty (July 20, 1938 -- November 29, 1981)

Forty-four:

F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jazz Age novelist and spokesman for the "lost generation" (September 24, 1896 -- December 21, 1940)
Marvin Gaye, revered D.C.-born soul and R&B singer, victim of filicide (April 2, 1939 -- April 1, 1984)
Billie Holiday, Baltimore-raised jazz and blues singer, one of the great voices (April 7, 1915 -- July 17, 1959)
Jackson Pollock, Wyoming-born abstract expressionist painter, "Jack the Dripper" (January 28, 1912 -- August 11, 1956)
Baruch Spinoza, Dutch lens-grinder and rationalist philosopher who wrote the "Ethics" (November 24, 1632 -- February 21, 1677)

Forty-five:

Nat "King" Cole, Alabama-born and Chicago-raised singer and jazz musician, Natalie's dad (March 17, 1919 -- February 15, 1965)
Freddie Mercury, Zanzibar-born flamboyant frontman of British rock band Queen (September 5, 1946 -- November 24, 1991)
Rick Nelson, New Jersey-born TV star and musician, one of the first teen idols (May 8, 1940 -- December 31, 1985)

Forty-six:

Albert Camus, Algerian-born French existentialist author and philosopher (November 7, 1913 -- January 4, 1960)
Rajiv Gandhi, Prime Minister of India, son of Indira Gandhi and grandson of Jawaharlal Nehru (August 20, 1944 -- May 21, 1991)
John Fitzgerald Kennedy, young and charismatic American President, space program supporter (May 29, 1917 -- November 22, 1963)
George Orwell, British novelist and political commentator claimed by the left and the right (June 25, 1903 -- January 21, 1950)
Andre "the Giant" Roussimoff, French-born professional wrestler who appeared in The Princess Bride (May 19, 1946 -- January 27, 1993)
Oscar Wilde, Anglo-Irish playwright and wit who was imprisoned for "gross indecency" (October 16, 1854 -- November 30, 1900)

Forty-seven:

Laura Branigan, singer from New York state best remembered for her 1982 hit "Gloria" (July 3, 1957 -- August 26, 2004)
Judy Garland, star of musical films, portrayer of Dorothy, mother of Liza Minnelli (June 10, 1922 -- June 22, 1969)
Frida Kahlo, Mexican painter, socialist, spouse of a painter, Salma Hayek character (July 6, 1907 -- July 13, 1954)
Jack Kerouac, Massachusetts-born "Beat Generation" author, counterculture hero (March 12, 1922 -- October 21, 1969)
Persis Khambatta, former Miss India who appeared in the first Star Trek movie (October 2, 1950 -- August 18, 1998)
Oliver "Billy" Sipple, U.S. Marine who foiled an assassination attempt on Gerald Ford (November 1941 -- January 1989)
Wendie Jo Sperber, Hollywood-born comic actress who played Marty McFly's sister (September 15, 1958 -- November 29, 2005)

Forty-eight:

J. L. Austin, Oxford philosopher remembered for discussing "performative utterances" (March 28, 1911 -- February 8, 1960)
Graham Chapman, Monty Python member, Cambridge medical student, Brian portrayer (January 8, 1941 -- October 4, 1989)
Marty Feldman, London-born comedian who appeared in "Young Frankenstein" and "Yellowbeard" (July 8, 1934 -- December 2, 1982)
Khalil Gibran, Lebanese-born adopted Bostonian remembered for writing "The Prophet" (January 6, 1883 -- April 10, 1931)
Wendy O. Williams, punk singer from the Plasmatics remembered for wild onstage antics (May 28, 1949 -- April 6, 1998)

Forty-nine:

Douglas Adams, quirky author best known for "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" (March 11, 1952 -- May 11, 2001)
Arthur Ashe, tennis player from Virginia, anti-apartheid spokesperson (July 10, 1943 -- February 6, 1993)
Isadora Duncan, flamboyant San Francisco-born performer, adopted Parisian, "mother of modern dance" (May 27, 1878 -- September 14, 1927)
Phil Hartman, comic actor, impressionist, graphic artist, alumnus of SNL and The Groundlings (September 24, 1948 -- May 28, 1998)
Nico, German model and actress who sang with the Velvet Underground (October 16, 1938(?) -- July 18, 1988)
Laura Nyro, understated and influential hippie-era singer-songwriter (October 18, 1947 -- April 8, 1997)
Dee Dee Ramone, original bassist for punk pioneers The Ramones (September 18, 1952 -- June 5, 2002)
Joey Ramone, tall shaggy vocalist for punk pioneers The Ramones (May 19, 1951 -- April 15, 2001)

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