Sixty:

Gary Cooper, stoic Montana-born actor who made many Western films (May 7, 1901 -- May 13, 1961)
Stephen Jay Gould, Harvard paleontologist and evolutionary biologist, Simpsons guest (September 10, 1941 -- May 20, 2002)
Walt Kelly, whimsical Connecticut-raised cartoonist who created "Pogo" (August 25, 1913 -- October 18, 1973)
George S. Patton, California-born World War II general, George C. Scott character (November 11, 1885 -- December 21, 1945)

Sixty-one:

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Romantic poet, author of "Kubla Khan" and "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (October 21, 1772 -- July 25, 1834)
Ernest Hemingway, minimalist writer, former Toronto journalist, bullfighting fan (July 21, 1899 -- July 2, 1961)
Robert Quine, punk guitarist known for innovative solos, nephew of a philosopher (December 30, 1942 -- May 31, 2004)
Walter Scott, Scottish historical novelist and poet who achieved international fame (August 14, 1771 -- September 21, 1832)

Sixty-two:

Sonny Bono, one-time spouse of Cher, mayor of Palm Springs, Republican congressman (February 16, 1935 -- January 5, 1998)
Thomas Nast, influential cartoonist who created the Republican elephant and Democratic donkey (September 27, 1840 -- December 7, 1902)
Carl Sagan, Brooklyn-born astronomer, science popularizer, novelist, humanist, and skeptic (November 9, 1934 -- December 20, 1996)
Ludwig Wittgenstein, Austrian philosopher, Cambridge student, author of the "Tractatus" (April 26, 1889 -- April 29, 1951)

Sixty-three:

Wilt Chamberlain, NBA star from Philadelphia, ladies' man, scorer of 100 points in a game (August 21, 1936 -- October 12, 1999)
Audrey Hepburn, aristocratic actress and humanitarian, portrayer of Holly Golightly (May 4, 1929 -- January 20, 1993)
Philip Larkin, Oxford-educated poet and librarian, Kingston-upon-Hull resident (August 9, 1922 -- December 2, 1985)
Mickey Mantle, much-beloved New York Yankees slugger born and raised in Oklahoma (October 20, 1931 -- August 13, 1995)
Rembrandt van Rijn, Leiden-born immortal and prolific painter of the "Dutch Golden Age" (July 15, 1606 -- October 4, 1669)
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, long-serving president who led America through the Depression and WWII (January 30, 1882 -- April 12, 1945)

Sixty-four:

Sammy Davis, Jr., Harlem-born song-and-dance man, all-round entertainer, and Rat Pack member (December 8, 1925 -- May 16, 1990)
Lyndon B. Johnson, Texan-born politican who succeeded JFK as president and chose not to run in 1968 (August 27, 1908 -- January 22, 1973)
C. S. Lewis, Oxford student, Christian apologist, author of The Chronicles of Narnia (November 29, 1898 -- November 22, 1963)
Karl Marx, German-born political philosopher buried in London, the big name in communism/socialism (May 5, 1818 -- March 14, 1883)
Wilson Pickett, Alabama-born performer who sang "Mustang Sally" and "Land of 1000 Dances" (March 18, 1941 -- January 16, 2006)

Sixty-five:

Johann Sebastian Bach, German Baroque-era composer and organist, musical immortal (March 21, 1685 -- July 28, 1750)
Francis Bacon, English philosopher and essayist who popularized the inductive method (January 22, 1561 -- April 9, 1626)
Lewis Carroll, children's author, Oxford mathematician, Anglican clergyman, photographer (January 27, 1832 -- January 14, 1898)
Walt Disney, cartoonist, amusement park founder, creator of Mickey and Donald (December 5, 1901 -- December 15, 1966)
David Hume, Scottish enlightenment philosopher, skeptic who discussed the "problem of induction" (April/May 1711 -- August 25, 1776)
Shari Lewis, puppeteer and ventriloquist best remembered for "Lamb Chop" (January 17, 1933 -- August 2, 1998)
Richard Pryor, Peoria-born comic and actor highly esteemed by other comedians (December 1, 1940 -- December 10, 2005)

Sixty-six:

W. H. Auden, Yorkshire-born poet, Oxford graduate and later Professor of Poetry at Oxford (February 21, 1907 -- September 29, 1973)
Marie Sklodowska Curie, Polish-born French scientist, winner of Nobel Prizes in two different fields (November 7, 1867 -- July 4, 1934)
W. C. Fields, Philadelphia-born actor and comedian, classic curmudgeonly misanthrope of the screen (January 29, 1880 -- December 25, 1946)
Indira Gandhi, long-serving Prime Minister of India, daughter of Jawaharlal Nehru (November 19, 1917 -- October 31, 1984)
Dudley Moore, comic actor and pianist, Arthur portrayer, colleague of Peter Cook (April 19, 1935 -- March 27, 2002)
Jesse Owens, Alabama-born, Cleveland-raised athlete who won four gold medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics (September 12, 1913 -- March 31, 1980)

Sixty-seven:

Ingrid Bergman, (August 29, 1915 -- August 29, 1982)
Bernhard Bolzano, (October 5, 1781 -- December 18, 1848)
Johnnie Cochran, (October 2, 1937 -- March 29, 2005)
E. E. Cummings, (October 14, 1894 -- September 3, 1962)
Ava Gardner, (December 24, 1922 -- January 25, 1990)
Peter Jennings, (July 29, 1938 -- August 7, 2005)
Adam Smith, (baptized June 5, 1723 -- July 17, 1790)
Hunter S. Thompson, (July 18, 1937 -- February 20, 2005)
Leonardo da Vinci, (April 15, 1452 -- May 2, 1519)

Sixty-eight:

Josephine Baker, (June 3, 1906 -- April 12, 1975)
William James, (January 11, 1842 -- August 26, 1910)
Rene Magritte, (November 21, 1898 -- August 15, 1967)
Don Martin, (May 18, 1931 -- January 6, 2000)
Ogden Nash, (August 19, 1902 -- May 19, 1971)
Shel Silverstein, (September 25, 1930 -- May 10, 1999)
Marion Tinsley, (February 3, 1927 -- April 3, 1995)

Sixty-nine:

Hannah Arendt, (October 14, 1906 -- December 4, 1975)
Desi Arnaz, (March 2, 1917 -- December 2, 1986)
Richard Feynman, (May 11, 1918 -- February 15, 1988)
Aldous Huxley, (July 26, 1894 -- November 22, 1963)

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